‘Hour of Code’ held at WMS recently


From staff reports



The seventh grade class also received awards for participating in the Hour of Code.


The eighth grade class also received awards for participating in the event.


Amy Frederick’s students at Washington Middle School recently participated in the largest learning event in history: The Hour of Code, during Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 7 – 13. Superintendent Matthew McCorkle took time to help with the event.


Principal Eric Wayne looks on at the students participating in The Hour of Code.


The sixth grade class received awards for participating. They are pictured with Amy Frederick.


Amy Frederick’s students at Washington Middle School recently participated in what they’re calling the largest learning event in history: The Hour of Code, during Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 7 – 13.

This event was an opportunity to learn what computer science is about. Research shows that students pick up programming concepts before they know how to read and write. In fact, their brains are more receptive to computer languages at a young age, just like foreign languages. Knowing how to build technology will give them confidence and know-how to succeed in many career options.

“The Hour of Code is designed to demystify code and show that computer science is not rocket-science, anybody can learn the basics,” said Hadi Partovi, founder and CEO of Code.org. “Over 100 million students worldwide have tried an Hour of Code. The demand for relevant 21st century computer science education crosses all borders and knows no boundaries.”

Code. org is supported by philanthropic donations from corporations, foundations and generous individuals.

Several eighth grade students commented on the event:

Trevor Minyo: “I thought the activity was fun. When we code games we are exploring and problem solving.”

Sam Shroeder: “Coding is a great skill to know. It can create more workers for the growing technical job industry. I think our school should offer coding classes.”

Brynne Frederick: “I greatly enjoyed it, as I’ve always wanted to create a classic-style RPG game, but always thought it was impossible since I thought computer coding was too difficult. I see this as a possible career option.”

Halli Wall: “This was a worthwhile activity. I thought it was fun. Having a programming class in school might inspire more kids to major in this in college and go into a needed computer science job.”

Sarah Anders: “I am not one much for computers. I hate computers but the Hour of Code was fun. This would probably be something I would do in my spare time.”

Eli Lynch: “I thought coding was a worthwhile experience. I have to admit, I didn’t think it would be fun but it was. I am not sure I would want programming as a career but I think that our school should offer it as a class.”

Comments from seventh grade students included:

Preston Hines: “Coding is needed because of developing jobs and positions that need filled.”

Emma Fumari: “Hour of Code was cool and it’s very different. I made a flappy bird game on the computer and I sent the game to my phone so I can play it in my free time.”

Analese Mitson: “I really enjoyed being part of Hour of Code. As young students, we are often asked, what will you be when you grow up? This enabled us to experiment with technology, which we don’t have the opportunity to do often. “

Rowdy Hay: “I just absolutely loved Hour of Code!!!”

Isabella Harter: “This was important since many jobs in the future will more than likely have coding.”

Teara Rickman: “I have actually done this before with my brother, Derrick. Now that I understand it, it seems really cool. I love doing this in my free time and would like to do more of it in school.”

Hayden Brown: “I think HOC is a great opportunity for kids around the world to learn coding. It is a great way to learn the basics of coding. I’m glad we took class time to do this and I think other students will enjoy this too.”

Several sixth grade students had the following comments about the experience:

Makenna Knisley: “I really enjoyed coding. I like to be introduced to something without any instruction and be able to do whatever I want. While running different experiments, I was able to find out what codes changed different objects on the screen. I was able to use that knowledge to make cool shapes and designs. I don’t think I would want to do it as a full time job though.”

Branton Dawes: “It was fun to code games because I was in control of what happened.”

Kassidy Olssen: “I really enjoy code because it helped me understand what people go through to make something that people enjoy. I think it is beneficial to everyone.”

Mac Miller: “I liked HOC because it opened a new door of careers that I was never introduced to. I wish there were classes for how to code so that if I would like to get a career in computer science, I could learn.”

Brendan Walter: “I like code. I don’t know if I’d want to work in it but I like coding. It is fun. I would take a class in it if there is one.”

Madeline Lynch: “I believe the Hour of Code was very beneficial and informational. I enjoyed learning the concepts of computer science and coding. I appreciate what it is doing for our world.”

Caroline Frederick: “I’m interested in coding and I am considering a career in video game designing, so it was relevant. Coding is also pretty fun, and in the scenario that if you created a class, I think kids would sign up because they might be interested in creating computer programs too.”

Mia Moats: “I really liked it! My favorite part was when we got to create pictures and make them as big, bright and colorful as we wanted. Honestly, I wouldn’t mind a job in computer science. This was not a waste of time. The environment we would work in as well, looked fun along with the job.”

Kishan Patel: “I liked the Hour of Code because I want to work in computer science and this is the first step to learn how to code. The Tynker Code Monster was really fun. You can do all sorts of things to make fun games.”

Emily Smith: “I have wanted to learn how to code for a while and finally there is a website for all ages and it is fairly simple. I think there should be a class in school about coding. Coding your own game would be better.”

The seventh grade class also received awards for participating in the Hour of Code.
http://recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Fredericks-Class-004.jpgThe seventh grade class also received awards for participating in the Hour of Code.

The eighth grade class also received awards for participating in the event.
http://recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Fredericks-Class-021.jpgThe eighth grade class also received awards for participating in the event.

Amy Frederick’s students at Washington Middle School recently participated in the largest learning event in history: The Hour of Code, during Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 7 – 13. Superintendent Matthew McCorkle took time to help with the event.
http://recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Fredericks-Class-029.jpgAmy Frederick’s students at Washington Middle School recently participated in the largest learning event in history: The Hour of Code, during Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 7 – 13. Superintendent Matthew McCorkle took time to help with the event.

Principal Eric Wayne looks on at the students participating in The Hour of Code.
http://recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Fredericks-Class-040.jpgPrincipal Eric Wayne looks on at the students participating in The Hour of Code.

The sixth grade class received awards for participating. They are pictured with Amy Frederick.
http://recordherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_Fredericks-Class-043.jpgThe sixth grade class received awards for participating. They are pictured with Amy Frederick.

From staff reports

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